Mental Health

Mental Health Services in Battle Creek MI | Consult Psychiatrist Online

Mental illness refers to a wide range of mental disorders that affect your mood, thinking and behavior. Examples of mental illness include depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, eating disorders and addictive behaviors.

Many people have mental health concerns from time to time. But a mental health concern becomes a mental illness when ongoing signs and symptoms cause frequent stress and affect your ability to function.

A mental illness can make you miserable and can cause problems in your daily life, such as at school or work or in relationships. In most cases, symptoms can be managed with a combination of medications and talk therapy (psychotherapy). Please call us. We can help you live a better life.

Mental Health Services in Battle Creek MI | Behavioral Health Care

Visuals increase attention; now science explains why

Visuals increase attention; now science explains why

Scientists report that norepinephrine, a fundamental chemical for brain performance, is locally regulated in a brain region called the visual cortex.
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Women who practice self-compassion are at lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Women who practice self-compassion are at lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Middle-aged women who practiced self-compassion had lower risk of developing cardiovascular disease, irrespective of their blood pressure, insulin resistance and cholesterol levels.
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Good mental health in young adults born after assisted reproduction

Good mental health in young adults born after assisted reproduction

Use of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) does not lead to poorer mental health in children across adolescence and young adulthood, according to a large observational study. The study found a slightly higher risk of obsessive-compulsive disorder for those born after ART but this was explained by parental background factors.
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Computer-, smartphone-based treatments effective at reducing symptoms of depression

Computer-, smartphone-based treatments effective at reducing symptoms of depression

Computer- and smartphone-based treatments appear to be effective in reducing symptoms of depression, and while it remains unclear whether they are as effective as face-to-face psychotherapy, they offer a promising alternative to address the growing mental health needs spawned by the COVID-19 pandemic, according to new research.
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Fine-tuning motivation in the brain

Fine-tuning motivation in the brain

Neuroscientists have discovered a set of brain cells that influence the motivation of mice to perform tasks for rewards. Increasing the cells' activity makes a mouse work harder or more vigorously. The neurons come with a feature that prevents the mouse from overdoing it and becoming addicted to the reward. The findings reveal new possible therapeutic strategies for treating mental illnesses like depression that impair motivation.
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A new understanding of mental illness

A new understanding of mental illness

The causes of psychiatric disorders are poorly understood. Now there is evidence that a wide range of early onset psychiatric problems (from depression, anxiety and addictions to dyslexia, bulimia, and ADHD) may be largely due to the combination of just three factors. The first is biological --i n the form of individual variability in the brain's dopamine reward pathway. The second is social -- and points to the important role of early childhood neglect or abuse. And the third is psychological--and relates to temperament, and particularly to tendencies toward impulsivity and difficulty controlling emotions. These findings have implications for understanding both the causes of a wide range of psychiatric disorders and the features worth targeting in early intervention efforts.
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Coping with schizophrenia, when emotions can be too much

Coping with schizophrenia, when emotions can be too much

Psychologists have revealed a surprising finding that could help those who struggle with schizophrenia: While people with the illness tend to manage low-level negative emotions, they struggle to do so as those negative emotions increase.
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Talk therapy by US psychiatrists declined by half since 1990s

Talk therapy by US psychiatrists declined by half since 1990s

Researchers analyzing 21 years of data found that the percentage of psychiatrist visits involving psychotherapy has declined by half -- dropping to only 21.6 % of patient visits. Over half of U.S. psychiatrists no longer practice any psychotherapy at all. The study found that for rural, Black, Hispanic, and Medicaid patients psychiatrists' provision of psychotherapy was exceedingly rare.
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Stress makes life’s clock tick faster: Chilling out slows it down

Stress makes life’s clock tick faster: Chilling out slows it down

Scientists in recent years have developed ways to measure biological age by tracking chemical changes in DNA that occur naturally as people age but occur at different times in different people. These so-called 'epigenetic clocks' have proved to be better predictors of lifespan and health than chronological age. In a new study, Yale researchers used one such clock, appropriately named "GrimAge," to ask two questions: How much does chronic stress accelerate that biological clock? And are there ways to slow it down and extend a healthy lifespan?
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Oops! You did it again; new test predicts if impulsivity is pathological

Oops! You did it again; new test predicts if impulsivity is pathological

If you can't stop saying or doing things that you later regret, here's a diagnostic test for you: Researchers have pioneered a way to better determine when acting on one's worst impulses verges on pathological. Turns out, acting more recklessly when your emotions run high can be correlated with how fast you react to stimulating visuals, especially disturbing ones.
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