Mental Health

Mental illness refers to a wide range of mental health conditions — disorders that affect your mood, thinking and behavior. Examples of mental illness include depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, eating disorders and addictive behaviors.

Many people have mental health concerns from time to time. But a mental health concern becomes a mental illness when ongoing signs and symptoms cause frequent stress and affect your ability to function.

A mental illness can make you miserable and can cause problems in your daily life, such as at school or work or in relationships. In most cases, symptoms can be managed with a combination of medications and talk therapy (psychotherapy). Please call us. We can help you live a better life.

Strong relationships in adulthood won’t ‘fix’ effects of early childhood adversity

Strong relationships in adulthood won’t ‘fix’ effects of early childhood adversity

Harsh conditions in early life are a fundamental cause of adult stress, and according to new research on wild baboons, this effect is not explained by a lack of social support in adulthood.
Read More
Experiencing childhood trauma makes body and brain age faster

Experiencing childhood trauma makes body and brain age faster

Children who suffer trauma from abuse or violence early in life show biological signs of aging faster than children who have never experienced adversity, according to new research. The study examined three different signs of biological aging -- early puberty, cellular aging and changes in brain structure -- and found that trauma exposure was associated with all three.
Read More
To improve students’ mental health, study finds, teach them to breathe

To improve students’ mental health, study finds, teach them to breathe

When college students learn specific techniques for managing stress and anxiety, their well-being improves across a range of measures and leads to better mental health, a new study finds.
Read More
Study highlights mental health risks facing healthcare workers during pandemic

Study highlights mental health risks facing healthcare workers during pandemic

A new study finds healthcare workers in the United States are struggling with a suite of mental-health challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study reports healthcare workers are at greater risk than the general public of experiencing health problems such as depression.
Read More
Major depressive episodes far more common than previously believed

Major depressive episodes far more common than previously believed

The number of adults in the United States who suffer from major depressive episodes at some point in their life is far higher than previously believed, a new study finds.
Read More
Laughter acts as a stress buffer — and even smiling helps

Laughter acts as a stress buffer — and even smiling helps

People who laugh frequently in their everyday lives may be better equipped to deal with stressful events - although this does not seem to apply to the intensity of laughter.
Read More
Botox injections may lessen depression

Botox injections may lessen depression

By analyzing the FDA database of adverse drug effects, researchers discovered that people who received Botox injections -- not just in the forehead -- reported depression significantly less often than patients undergoing different treatments for the same conditions.
Read More
Text messaging: The next gen of therapy in mental health

Text messaging: The next gen of therapy in mental health

In the US, approximately 19% of all adults have a diagnosable mental illness. Clinic-based services may fall short of meeting patient needs. In the first randomized controlled trial of its kind, a team investigated the impact of a texting intervention as an add-on to a mental health treatment program versus one without it. A new study finds that a text-messaging-based intervention can be a safe, clinically promising and feasible tool to augment care for people with serious mental illness.
Read More
Increased attention to sad faces predicts depression risk in teenagers

Increased attention to sad faces predicts depression risk in teenagers

Teenagers who tend to pay more attention to sad faces are more likely to develop depression, but specifically within the context of stress, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
Read More
Lithium in drinking water linked with lower suicide rates

Lithium in drinking water linked with lower suicide rates

Naturally occurring lithium in public drinking water may have an anti-suicidal effect - according to a new study. The study collated research from around the world and found that geographical areas with relatively high levels or concentration of lithium in public drinking water had correspondingly lower suicide rates.
Read More